Sonntag, April 6, 2014
Sonntag, April 6, 2014
1021girl:

snickerdoodlesandsausages:

enjolrasactual:

in-love-with-my-bed:

the-winchesters-creed:

ayellowstateofmind:

Imagine stabbing someone with this knife. 

It would instantly cauterize the would, so the person wouldn’t bleed, so it’s not very useful.

if you want information it is

and above, in order, we see a gryffindor, a ravenclaw, and a slytherin

why would you stab a PERSON when you can have TOAST?

There’s the hufflepuff
Sonntag, April 6, 2014

happytaffy:

Bold what applies to you!

You have watched at least 20 Disney movies.
You have watched at least 40 Disney movies.
You don’t eat dairy.
You work best at night time.
You take a selfie almost every day.
You laugh at the end of your sentences.
You wink at people.
You hate being tickled.
You want to travel the world in a boat.
You want to travel the world in a hippie wagon.
Your hair is fluffy.
Your hair is sleek.
Your hair is an artificial colour. 
You get takeout at least once per week.
You dislike the general public.
You have been caught sleepwalking.
You sleep with a plushie.
You have eaten an entire block of cheese in one sitting.
You have eaten a red hot chilli pepper.
You draw hearts on top of your i’s.
You have watched an episode of My Little Pony. (I own a couple of the old movies~)
You have a crush on someone who knows you. 
You keep plants in your room. 
You collect music CDs.
You take vitamin supplements.
You read mostly non-fiction. 
You go on Tumblr every day without fail.
You have published a YouTube video.
You have a fandom blog.
You have eaten Pocky.
You can play the violin.
You can play the harp.
You prefer vampires to zombies.
You prefer zombies to vampires.
You have been described as naive.
You have been described as suspicious.
You have had a stalker.
You liked going to school.
You have a pear-shaped body.
You have an apple-shaped body.
You have sensitive teeth. 
You like your job.
You have a slow internet connection.
Your phone is not a touch phone.
You are the dominant one in a relationship. 
You like watercolour painting.
You like playing the drums.
You are scared of loud noises.
You eat food in your bed.
You are shy but not quiet.
You are quiet but not shy. 
You plan a lot of parties.
You have an alter ego.
You are good with money.
You are afraid of intimacy.
You normally have dinner after 8pm.
You normally wear high heels.
You have been grounded more than once.
You have never seen Shrek.
You have won a trophy.
Your favourite ice cream flavour is mint.
Your favourite ice cream flavour is vanilla.
Your favourite ice cream flavour is strawberry.
You are good at sports.
You have a skin care routine.
You are a D-cup or larger.
You have long legs and arms.
You add ketchup to everything.
You have an anime figurine.
You have danced and not cared who saw it.
You want to go into outer space.
You want to rule the world.

You constantly hurt somewhere.
You are scared of mice.
You are scared of horses.
You are scared of butterflies.
You have one or more moles on your face. 
You are good with children.
You have learning difficulties.
You drink at least 7 pints of water per day.
You want to be a singer in a band.
You have bought a frame for a special picture.
Your favourite Disney Princess isn’t Belle, Ariel or Rapunzel
You prefer to watch than participate.
You have dark skin. 
You have dated 5 or more people.
You have been told you are a cool person.
You have been told you are a scary person.
You are doing this post because you are bored. (no I should be doing other things;;;;;;;;;;)

Samstag, April 5, 2014

acrumblebatchwithcustardfreeman:

tardisinthemindpalace:

dontblink91011:

luigiman:

my cousin asked me what my favorite season was and i said “of what” and i just

it’s frightening how long it took me to figure out what was wrong with that response

this is me, getting this post after seeing it for the seventh time

image

Once I got it, I immediately thought of this:

image

Samstag, April 5, 2014
drquinzel:

moniquill:

NO PETTING, ONLY MURDER

I actually squeeled like a girl when I saw this
Samstag, April 5, 2014
justsayins:

cosplayforall:

We have a con coming up in Australia, and one of my friends couldn’t get a cosplay done in time. But he put this together.
He made a “cosplay superhero” called Captain Patch-It (sometimes lovingly refered to as “the Fairy Cosmother”), and his costume consists of anything and everything you can think of in case someone has an accident or malfunction with their cosplay. He’s an awesome guy.
I thought everyone would like to see his idea

I WANT TO DO THIS

Please tell me he had a hot-glue gun in a holster :D
Samstag, April 5, 2014
gehayi:

atalantapendrag:

fatanarchy:

THIS IS WHAT ANARCHY LOOKS LIKE.

Hope for the future.

This kid is incredible.
Samstag, April 5, 2014
sharrmander:

sweet-chin-musical:

sushinfood:

the-unpopular-opinions:

This is an opinion brought to you by a rancher, who knows quite a few other ranchers and dairy farms.
I recently watched a documentary called Earthlings, which gets praised on a lot in the Vegan, animal rights, and animal welfare tags.
This documentary is complete, biased, exaggerated, and twisted bullshit (At least when it comes to beef and dairy, which is what I’m talking about)
It opens on beef with branding, showing an animal being hot ironed on the face. In my state, you cannot register to brand a cow on a face. In fact, the face is the least common branding site available, as it can damage the cow’s jaw and make it difficult for her to eat. The most common branding site is the hip, rib, and shoulder, but the documentary simply says, cows are branded on their face.
Does it say why? No. Because obviously we scar our animals for fun, right? Cattle don’t have microchips like a dog. If your dog gets stolen, you can usually find it because of it’s Microchipped. Cows don’t have that. Cows are so expensive, they’re like gold, so often Ranchers brand their cattle. If a cow has a brand, she cannot be sold without the brand owner’s authorization, meaning, someone can not steal young, healthy animals from my pasture, and sell them for slaughter.
Next they go on to dehorning, stating that it is cruel, painful, and often done with simple pliers. HAaha.
If I have an animal, I don’t want to ruin it by painfully tearing off it’s horns. This animal will never let me touch it again!
Most cattle, and I DO mean most, are dehorned either as calves (Less painful, not remembered), or have a shot to numb the area at the base of the horn before it’s CUT off, not YANKED off. This way, the cow can still be handled.
Does the documentary say WHY cattle are dehorned? Does it mention that a cow with horns is a danger to itself, humans, and other animals? No? Of course not!
Beef cattle are not stuffed into trailers until it’s so full the animals die. This makes absolutely no sense. If the animals die before they reach the sale ring or slaughter house, no paycheck for you! You make less money if the animals die before slaughter.
Nothing the documentary covers is explained why. WHY do they do that? It’s biased. It makes it seem like ranchers and farmers WANT to hurt their cattle. They don’t. Most of us get attached to our cows. It exaggerates EVERYTHING
Dairy
According to the documentary, Dairy cattle are CHAINED to their stalls, in their own feces, with no water or food, pumped full of hormones to make them milk more. Wrong.
A dairy barn consists of a long isle down the middle of the barn, with a large alley on each side for the cattle. The cattle can walk down the main alley, or lay in a padded stall. They can stick their head through railings to eat food specially mixed to meet all their needs, or drink water. Dairy barns, because they produce milk that MUST be clean, cannot milk a cow pumped full or hormones and chemicals, and clean their barns daily to avoid bacteria. WOW! It’s almost like we take care of our animals so they produce! WHO KNEW?
Most dairy cattle are allowed to graze in a pasture with their calves, until they’re milked in the morning and the evening. Others keep their cows in a well airated barn. Calves are removed to avoid injury! Calves are often kept it smaller pens, with calf huts, pads, soft bedding, and even blankets! It is counter productive to not care for a calf. A calf is your future cow! Dairy farmers feed them the highest quality milk so the calves grow into strong, productive animals.
Dieing cows are not left in the isles. If a cow begins to appear sick, a vet is called. Simple as that.
The documentary states that a cow’s lifespan can reach 20. WRONG. at the age of 8 or 9, a cow starts to lose her teeth. If you kept a cow alive until 20 she would be malnourished and miserable, unable to eat. The average cow lives until 8 or 9, at which point they are sold. It would be cruel to keep an animal who cannot eat or fulfill it’s own needs.
Cows do not, on average, die at FOUR YEARS OLD because of exhaustion! Four years, at almost any dairy or ranch you visit, is a cow in her PRIME! We do not run our animals to death. We do NOT torture them.
You don’t eat meat? Great! Do your thing! Eat your veggies! That’s fine! But don’t make me out to be devilspawn if I eat meat. Don’t make me out to be cruel, (As stated by the documentary, as cruel as hitler to the jews), because I raise cattle. Fuck. You.
The shit thing about that documentary is it preys on people who have never been on a farm or dairy. If you’ve never been to one, it’s easy to believe things like this. If I made a documentary about how vegans grew their food, and showed it to people who have never met Vegans, or seen how crops are grown, I could easily exaggerate and make Veganism seem horrible, like this documentary does to livestock owners.
Please stop hating on ranchers and farmers. Please?

Signal boost because I’m tired of seeing people on this website base all of their “learnings” on farm life through biased cumentaries. Read it. Learn it.

I used to spend every weekend on my friends dairy farm as a kid. It’s NOTHING like the vegan documentaries suggest.

Signal boost!!!
Samstag, April 5, 2014
thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math


Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!
Freitag, April 4, 2014
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